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The Importance of Comfort Objects

By: M.L. Lewis

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Frank

A quick word before this article. I’d like a moment to introduce M.L. Lewis, the latest addition to our writing team! With years of experience writing and a Ph. D. in Paranormal Studies coming up, she’s sure to give us all the wonderful flesh-tearing content we’ve been waiting for. Lewis, welcome to the team!

 

The Importance of Comfort Objects – by M.L. Lewis

Comfort objects, or transitional objects, can provide you with many psychological benefits. They are any object that brings us some sort of emotional relief. They can be anything from a stuffed toy, a doll, or a blanket. The most popular comfort object is the teddy bear. During a disaster things are going to be very tense and high strung, so investing in comfort objects will be very beneficial in your long-term survival plan.

5. They relieve stress
Comfort objects remind us of our carefree youth. The good times, before zombies, took over the earth. They are the cornerstone of any childhood. Psychologists have run multiple clinical trials and found that these objects provide trauma victims with considerable comfort as they go through therapy. 90% of those studied found that just stroking the soft fur of a plush toy was very therapeutic. The world around you may change, and people may die, but your object will always be loyal till the end.

4. Invokes a sense of stability and security
Comfort objects have been proven to bring us some sort of internal peace and relaxation. Biologically, humans crave feeling secure in new surroundings. During the Zombie Apocalypse, things will become uncertain. Everyday living will be a consent battle, wither it be fighting a herd of zombies trying to eat you, or a herd of raiders trying to steal what little water you have, you will have to fight for everything. Your object will always be there at your side through the good and bad times. Plus, being immune to walker bites means you’ll never have to worry about losing your best friend to the virus.

3. Has an adverse effect on social exclusion
During the Zombie Apocalypse, you’ll be spending a lot of time alone. Humans are biologically social creatures and being away from human contact for a long period of time can be psychologically damaging. During prolonged periods of isolation, you’ll find yourself experiencing high levels of anxiety, difficulty concentrating, and even hallucinating. You’re going to need something to give you some form of human contact before you go insane. This is another thing comfort objects are good at. They can act as a substitute for human interaction and bring you all the joys of a trusted friend.

2. They remind us of a lost loved one
Comfort objects are usually given to us by someone we love. We get them as presents for birthdays, Christmas, and other life events. These objects then became a small part of our past, as looking at these objects bring back fond memories of the person who gave it to us. They are a symbol of the love and joy we once had for that particular person. Even though this person may not be with us physically anymore, their memory will live on through the object.

1. Owning one doesn’t make you less an adult
Owning a comfort object doesn’t make you less an adult. 35% of adults surveyed said they sleep with some form of a plush toy. 25% of businessmen claim they travel with their comfort objects on business trips. 90% of college students say they brought some sort of object from home when they traveled to colleges in their freshmen year. Me, I keep a plush bear on my desk that was given to me by my mom when I moved out of state to pursue a film career. Comfort objects help us combat the loneliness we encounter on a daily basis. They keep us in touch with our feelings and make every day a little less stressful on us.

M.L. Lewis

Written by M.L. Lewis

M.L. Lewis is not new to the world of writing. She has written various short stories and poems throughout the years and has won multiple awards in art and literature. The highest honor she received was Poet of the Year in 2000, and again in 2005. A poem she wrote in honor of law enforcement can be seen in the book, Everything You Wanted to Know about the Heroes in Blue. She was also featured in Encounter magazine for the volunteer work she did for the United States troops. In 2010 she won Resident of the Year in a local newspaper titled The South Hills Messanger. Today, she spends her time increasing her knowledge on disaster preparedness while working on her Ph. D. in Paranormal Studies.

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