There's more..

  • in

    700 A.D., Frisia, the Netherlands

    Recorded Attack

    Although this event appears to have taken place on or around 700 A.D., physical evidence comes in the form of a painting recently discovered in the vaults of the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam. Analyses of the materials themselves fix the date listed above. The picture itself shows a collection of knights in full armor, attacking a […] More

  • in

    177 A.D., Nameless Settlement near Tolosa, Aquitania (SW France)

    Recorded Attack

    Around 177 A.D., near what is known as south-western France, a traveling merchant sent a personal letter to his brother about his encounter with a zombie: “He came from the woods, a man of stinking rot. His gray skin bore many wounds, from which flowed no blood. Upon seeing the screaming child, his body seemed […] More

  • in

    156 A.D., Castra Regina, Germania (Southern Germany)

    156 A.D., Castra Regina, Germania (Southern Germany)- In Castra Regina, Germania around 156 A.D, an attack by seventeen zombies left a prominent cleric infected. The Roman commander that was sent to dispatch the outbreak, recognizing the signs of a newly turned zombie, ordered his troops to destroy the former holy man. The “death” of the […] More

  • in

    140-41 A.D., Thamugadi, Numidia (Algeria)

    In 140-41 A.D., Lucious Valerius Strabo, Roman governor of Thamugadi, Numidia (Algeria) recorded six small zombie outbreaks among desert nomads. All the outbreaks were crushed by two cohorts from the III Augusta Legionary base, with a total of 134 dispatched zombies, and the cohorts suffering only 5 Roman casualties. Other than the official report, a […] More

  • in

    121 A.D., Fanum Cocidi, Caledonia (Scotland)

    Even though the source of the outbreak is still a mystery, its events are meticulously recorded. A plague of zombies swept through the local villages. The local barbarian chieftain and his men, not knowing what they were dealing with, wrongly thought the undead were merely insane, and thus no real threat. Over 3,000 Pictish and […] More

  • in

    212 B.C., China

    During the Qin Dynasty, the Emperor ordered all books not relating to practical matters, like construction or farming, to be burned to guard against so-called “dangerous thoughts”. While we will never know with certainty whether accounts of zombie attacks were destroyed, a excerpt from a obscure medical manuscript, which was hidden in the wall of […] More

  • in

    329 B.C., Afghanistan

    An unnamed Macedonian column built by the legendary conqueror Alexander the Great was visited many times by Soviet Special Forces during their own war of occupation. Five miles from the monument, one unit discovered the ancient remains of what is believed to be Hellenic Army barracks. Among other artifacts, there was a small bronze vase. […] More

  • in

    500 B.C., Africa

    During his voyage to explore and colonize the continent’s western coast, Hanno of Carthage, one of Western civilization’s most famous ancient mariners, wrote in his sea log: 500 B.C., Africa On the shores of a great jungle, where green hills hide their crowns above the clouds, I dispatched an expedition inland in search of sweet […] More

  • in

    3000 B.C., Hieraconpolis, Egypt

    A British dig in 1892 unearthed a nondescript tomb, in Hieraconpolis, Egypt. No clues could be found to reveal who the person who occupied it was or anything about his place in society. The body was found outside the open crypt, curled up in a corner and only partially decomposed. Thousands of scratch marks adorned […] More