156 AD Castra Regina Germania (Southern Germany)

156 AD Castra Regina Germania (Southern Germany)

156 AD Castra Regina Germania (Southern Germany)- In Castra Regina, Germania around 156 A.D, an attack by seventeen zombies left a prominent cleric infected. The Roman commander that was sent to dispatch the outbreak, recognizing the signs of a newly turned zombie, ordered his troops to destroy the former holy man. The “death” of the zombified cleric enraged the local citizens of the region, and started a riot.

The aftermath of the outbreak and the unfortunate riot left 10 zombies killed, including the holy man, 17 Roman casualties (due to the riot), and the deaths of 198 civilians.

About the region and history:

The first settlements in Regensburg date from the Stone Age. The Celtic name Radasbona was the oldest given to a settlement near the present city. Around AD 90, the Romans built a fort there.

In 179, a new Roman fort, called Castra Regina (“fortress by the river Regen”), was built for Legio III Italica during the reign of Emperor Marcus Aurelius.[3] It was an important camp at the most northerly point of the Danube; it corresponds to what is today the core of Regensburg’s Old City or Altstadt east of the Obere and Untere Bachgasse and west of the Schwanenplatz. It is believed that as early as in late Roman times the city was the seat of a bishop, and St Boniface re-established the Bishopric of Regensburg in 739.

From the early 6th century, Regensburg was the seat of a ruling family known as the Agilolfings. From about 530 to the first half of the 13th century, it was the capital of Bavaria. Regensburg remained an important city during the reign of Charlemagne. In 792, Regensburg hosted the ecclesiastical section of Charlemagne’s General Assembly, the bishops in council who condemned the heresy of adoptionism taught by their Spanish counterparts, Elipandus of Toledo and Felix of Urgell. After the partition of the Carolingian Empire in 843, the city became the seat of the Eastern Frankish ruler, Louis II the German. Two years later, fourteen Bohemian princes came to Regensburg to receive baptism there. This was the starting point of Christianization of the Czechs, and the diocese of Regensburg became the mother diocese of that of Prague. These events had a wide impact on the cultural history of the Czech lands, as they were consequently part of the Roman Catholic and not the Slavic-Orthodox world. A memorial plate at St John’s Church (the alleged place of the baptism) was unveiled a few years ago, commemorating the incident in the Czech and German languages.

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Written by Frank

Dutch guy living in Finland. Founded Zombie Guide Magazine in 2012 as a hobby project.. Which is still is to this day. Besides writing, my passions are fitness, the outdoors and good food.